Asian Art Scarves

The Himalaya Scarf

The Himalaya Scarf in Magenta   The Himalaya Scarf in Sky

The Koryo Scarf

The Koryo Scarf in Celadon   The Koryo Scarf in Champagne

The Ming Scarf

The Ming Scarf in Sapphire   The Ming Scarf in Ruby

The Oribe Scarf

The Oribe Scarf in Wine   The Oribe Scarf in Pale Gold

The Taj Mahal Scarf

The Taj Scarf in Slate   The Taj Scarf in Gold

The Koryo Scarf

Inspired by the celadon-glazed ceramics of Korea's ancient Koryo Dynasty


Koryo Scarf in Celadon color with gift box  Koryo Scarf in Celadon color close-up  Koryo Scarf in Celadon color full design  Koryo Scarf in Champagne color with gift box  Koryo Scarf in Champagne color close-up  Koryo Scarf in Champagne color full design
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Availabe in two colors:
Koryo Scarf in Celadon color
Celadon
Koryo Scarf in Champagne color
Champagne

- 33" x 33" (85 x 85 cm)
- 100% silk twill
- hand rolled edges
(gift box no longer available)

Please note:
Asian Art Scarves are available for volume buyers only. We don't sell to retail customers. If you would like to buy Asian Art Scarves in quantity to use as gifts for corporate events or similar occasions please e-mail us at trade@tasaram.com.



More about Korea's Celadon ceramics...


The crane, cloud and willow tree motifs of the Koryo Scarf are inspired by the celadon-glazed ceramics that were perfected in Korea during the Koryo Dynasty (916-1392).The crane, cloud and willow tree motifs of the Koryo Scarf are inspired by the celadon-glazed ceramics that were perfected in Korea during the Koryo Dynasty (916-1392).

Such was the passion of Korean aristocracy for the refined grey-green hue of celadon ceramics that not only vases, dishes and incense burners, but also hair oil bottles and even roof tiles were created with celadon glazes. The shimmering lustre of the glaze is notoriously hard to achieve and requires the ceramic to be fired twice at high temperatures.

A celadon-glazed ceramic from Korea's Koryo Dynasty (916-1392)Celadon ceramics were often enhanced by auspicious patterns and motifs, typically flowers and foliage, cranes and curling stylised clouds. These motifs were first incised into the body of the unfired pot, then the grooves were painstakingly inlaid using white and red clays. During firing the white clay retains its color, and the red clay turns black. Cranes are a favourite motif in both Korean and Chinese art. Associated with Taoist mythology, they symbolise longevity and the flight upwards towards paradise.

So renowned were the celadon ceramics of the Koryo dynasty that the Chinese, themselves masters of ceramics, designated them 'the best under heaven' and traders from as far away as Arabia sang their praises. Despite many attempts to match the depth and hue of the glazes and the grace and spontaneity of the motifs, Koryo celadon ceramics have never been equalled and today fetch huge sums on the international art market.

Details on a celadon-glazed ceramic from Korea's Koryo Dynasty (916-1392) A Korean Temple