Asian Art Scarves

The Himalaya Scarf

The Himalaya Scarf in Magenta   The Himalaya Scarf in Sky

The Koryo Scarf

The Koryo Scarf in Celadon   The Koryo Scarf in Champagne

The Ming Scarf

The Ming Scarf in Sapphire   The Ming Scarf in Ruby

The Oribe Scarf

The Oribe Scarf in Wine   The Oribe Scarf in Pale Gold

The Taj Mahal Scarf

The Taj Scarf in Slate   The Taj Scarf in Gold

The Oribe Scarf

Inspired by the distinctive 'patchwork' designs of Japan's medieval Oribe ceramics


Oribe Scarf in Wine color with gift box  Oribe Scarf in Wine color close-up  Oribe Scarf in Wine color full design  Oribe Scarf in Pale Gold color with gift box  Oribe Scarf in Pale Gold color close-up  Oribe Scarf in Pale Gold color full design
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Availabe in two colors:
Oribe Scarf in Wine color
Wine
Oribe Scarf in Pale Gold color
Pale Gold

- 33" x 33" (85 x 85 cm)
- 100% silk twill
- hand rolled edges
- blue gift box available (+$9.00)

Price: $50

Shipping $7.50. FREE shipping on two or more scarves (any combination).


   
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More about Japan's Oribe ceramics...


Kinkakuji - The 'Golden Temple' in Kyoto, JapanThe Oribe Scarf features the unique patterns and colors of Japan's historic and highly distinctive Oribe ceramics. This style, which dates back to the late 16th century, bears the name of its creator, the samurai and tea ceremony master Furuta Oribe (1544-1615).

Distinctive ceramics are an essential element of the Japanese tea ceremony. In Furuta Oribe's day the fashion was for restrained, almost rustic styles. The ceramics that he created, however, were radically different - characterised by patches of glossy dark green copper glaze, balancing areas of patterning painted straight onto the cream stoneware body of the pottery. A variation featured the same dark green glaze on a deep red stoneware body.

An Oribe item with typical geometric and floral patterns, often divided up into a series of sections or 'windows' which frame and/or divide the surface of the pottery. The painting style is bold and dynamic, using a brown or black iron oxide pigment.Typical patterns are geometric or floral, often divided up into a series of sections or 'windows' which frame and/or divide the surface of the pottery. The painting style is bold and dynamic, using a brown or black iron oxide pigment.

A piece of Oribe wareAll this was a radical departure from standard ceramic designs and a clear challenge to the refined values and aesthetics of the day. Furuta Oribe's contemporaries appear to have been shocked and impressed in equal measure and Oribe Ware quickly became a sensation. Oribe-style pottery continues to be made in the Seto and Mino kilns of Japan's Gifu Prefecture and is widely used in homes and restaurants. It is a great tribute to Furuta Oribe's adventurous sense of creativity that 400 years on Oribe Ware still appears avant-garde.